Pediatric Speech Therapy Helps Children Attain Speech Clarity

There are many reasons a child’s speech is unintelligible. Children sometimes have what is known as an ‘articulation disorder’ which is characterized by sound substitutions such as ‘wabbit’ instead of ‘rabbit’, “thoap” instead of “soap”, or “tookie instead of “cookie”. Another disorder, known as a ‘phonological disorder’, occurs when there is difficulty producing a particular speech pattern. Examples include, ‘final sound deletion’ where the ending of every word is left off, or ‘initial sound substitution’ where the beginning sound is substituted for another even though the child can say the correct sound (‘daw instead of ‘saw’, or ‘douse’ for ‘house’). Apraxia of speech is a more complex disorder where a child is able to make all the movements found in speech production until they try to talk. When they want to talk it’s difficult or sometimes impossible to make the same movements. In addition, the errors are inconsistent. Sometimes they say a sound or word correctly and other times they do not. Last, is a motor speech disorder known as dysarthria. As the name suggests, lack of clarity is the result of disturbance in the muscular control of the jaw, lips, and tongue.